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Parliamentary elections to be held in Feb/March: Foreign Minister

Reuters – Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said on Friday that parliamentary elections would be held “between February and March”, to be followed by a presidential vote in “early summer.” The elections will replace the leaders appointed after the army ousted elected president Mohamed Morsi in July. Fahmy’s comments to Reuters in an interview were the most …


Reuters – Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy said on Friday that parliamentary elections would be held “between February and March”, to be followed by a presidential vote in “early summer.”

The elections will replace the leaders appointed after the army ousted elected president Mohamed Morsi in July. Fahmy’s comments to Reuters in an interview were the most specific timeline announced to date for the end of the transitional government.

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  • nemiajila

    How can be these election credible when they have banned all the political parties ?

    • Biff Jay

      yes, and they banned the parties that won 5 elections in a row that were deemed free and fair by the highest echelons of international observers.

      It’s like having a World Cup, but not allowing Barcelona to compete. It’s a joke. One large chunk of Egyptian society will not be represented.

      • Intellectualist

        One small chunk that does not play fair and imposes bigotry isn’t a relevant player.

        • Biff Jay

          What are you talking about. These are millions of people. Demographics. You might as well support genocide talking like that. Also, it’s not a small chunk at all. 30% minimum.

          • Intellectualist

            And 30% is not a majority that should impose theocracy and bigotry on the 70%.

          • Biff Jay

            Democracy has too many checks and balances to impose a theocracy. Even if they were trying to do so, they wouldn’t have been able to. Just like secularists would not be able to impose a 100% secular state in a country like Egypt. Stop criminalizing people for believing in policies you don’t agree with.

            Secondly, you are making a grave mistake to think that only 30% believe in Theocracy. I said that’s roughly the minimum of who would be in favor of the current Islamist parties based on the lowest ever recorded public poll of their approval rating (Might I mention that Pew showed Morsi with a 53% approval rating in May? I find it a tad bid strange).

            You may want to realize that multiple surveys have been conducted in Egypt to determine how many people believe legislation and laws should be according to Shariah. While I have seen some from years ago well above 80%, the current survey conducted by Pew is 76% if I remember correctly (go look it up for yourself if you don’t believe me).

            So most Egyptians feel that Islamic Shariah law is in fact best and a country running itself according to those laws would be ideal. That doesn’t mean they all trust the BRotherhood. Furthermore, you may have a disproportionate estimate of Egypt’s demographics since the liberal voices monopolize the airwaves in Egypt (and they silence the conservative or Islamist voices). Cairo does not represent most of Egypt, despite it being the liberal heartland and the center of anti-Islamicism.

            Due to Egypt’s conservative nature, liberals have been forced to approach the situation with this attitude that they know what’s best for Egyptians and that they are “saving the people from themselves.” Only ideas can change ideas. Silencing the conservative currents or ensuring that they are not represented in the long run of politics is not the key to stability.

          • Intellectualist

            Well you fail to address the fact that theocracy is blatant bigotry. The bigotry of demanding religiously based laws to oppress the normal people is criminal. We know religious fundamentalism is a biological disorder and not a mere opinion. We know the intelligence levels of religious conservatives is abysmally low. Do you think those who spread hatred of others and display little intelligence should have louder voices than those who treat all fairly and can communicate such? Advocating that stupid people have authority to impose hateful policies is in itself a crime against humanity.

          • Biff Jay

            Don’t change the subject. People want Shariah because they believe it’s right. If you dont like it, then change their ideas. Don’t exclude it from the marketplace of ideas. That won’t work. That will just piss off a lot of people. Everyone has to compromise. Secularists won’t get their way 100%. Islamists won’t get their way 100%. That’s the beauty of an effective democracy.

            You are talking about millions of people. And most of them are decent people

          • Intellectualist

            So let them engage without spewing hatred and bigotry. Keep their “decent” values set apart from everyone else’s civil rights and nobody loses. When the religious figure out that a secular governance does more to protect them that a theocratic one, they’ll appreciate their freedom. You don’t want them to be free. Free means everyone, not just a few or even most, but EVERYONE. And this IS the subject.

          • Biff Jay

            You prove my point. Any light flavoring of Islam and you guys blow up. It’s you who is intolerant. You have a country, Egypt, where according to polls by Pew, around 3/4 to 4/5 of the entire country believes Shariah law is the way things should go, in other words nearly the entire population. Yet having a mostly non-Islamic legislation with a couple tiny mentioning or flavorings of Islam and you all go bonkers and call it a theocracy.

            You wish to allow everyone to compete in the marketplace of ideas, except those who believe Islam is the solution. You are not really democratic. And over the last 2 years, regardless of what paranoid fools will say, Egypt has never been even close to the brink of an Islamic theocracy.

          • Intellectualist

            Those who believe islam is the solution cannot alter the fact that their views are prejudicial and discriminatory. It doesn’t matter how many fail to think through their stated views and how many can. A governance of bigotry cannot achieve peace. Just look at Israel. Do they have a jewish right to be bigots toward muslims? If you have an islamist right, then shouldn’t the Palestinians all just leave Israel ? Fair is fair. If you don’t drop the islamism, you must suffer the zionism. There is no other way to end the conflict. It takes a higher level of thinking to understand the problems that absolutism creates. And nonislamic doesn’t apply to your government. Non islamist maybe. I still think your secularists are muslims aren’t they?

          • Biff Jay

            Ok, think what you want. But it won’t work to rationalize the exclusion or by not representing certain demographics under the rationale that you think you need to save people from themselves.

            Only the competitive marketplace of ideas will change people and ideas, and if that means some religiously conservative laws for a while, then so be it. Society will flesh itself out, but it can’t be forced. And it can’t exclude anyone, including Islamists.

          • Intellectualist

            Then you must endure the palestinian issue forever. Someone has to lay down their bigotry or it won’t go away. If you’re unwilling, perhaps Netanyahu should pay you instead of his friends.

          • Biff Jay

            Everyone has the right to be represented by political parties they identify with. Even if you don’t agree with them.

          • Intellectualist

            Right. But a party that declares no other views are permissable doesn’t allow that. That’s why an islamist party is not productive. An islamic party is everyone essentially. Either you all allow everyone to vote on issues other than religious supremacy or you legitimize all other groups that claim their religious supremacy and endless wars and conflicts continue. This problem doesn’t remain within Egypt.

          • Biff Jay

            Egypt’s Islamic parties have not declared all other views are not permissible. Either you don’t understand political Islam and would suggest a college level coursework on the subject or you are just feeding into propaganda. Even if Islamists in secret believe no other views are permissible, the same could be said for secularists: they believe Islamist views are not permissible, and unlike the Islamists, they don’t feel the need to be silent about it.

            if Islamists are not productive, then there should be nothing to fear in allowing them to compete in the marketplace of ideas. They don’t think secularists are productive. Ideas must be challenged with ideas. You can’t simply exclude or silence ideas, even Islamist ideas.

          • Intellectualist

            All your parties are islamic. The islamist party does very clearly state as its basis that there no other but. That is by definition what political islam is. Rail all you want about being excluded but in the game of politics a party that does accept any other views as legitimate is not even in the arena. they are outside the realm of civilized society and have no legitimate purpose in politics except to thwart concensus

          • Biff Jay

            again, you are making the mistake in accusing Islamic parties of not accepting others views. I think all parties believe their platform is the best, and wish it could be implemented 100%, but in the end they know that’s not possible. Socialists would hope for a 100% socialist state if they could convince everyone to get on board. Everyone tolerates everyone, and no one should be excluded.

            As far as the last couple years ago, Islamic parties in Egypt have been far more tolerant of the other parties, than they were of Islamist parties. The behavior i’ve seen among the parties in the last 2 years speaks volumes. Also, look at Tunisia: a very moderately flavored Islamic party that has offered to step down and have dialogue with all the parties to come to a solution, but still, that’s not good enough for the secularists and liberals there. They want total disappearance of the elected party. They act like spoiled sore losers.

          • Intellectualist

            Biff, the islamists aren’t banned from being a party of social conservatives. They’re banned from being a party of a religion. Simply reinventing the party on the basis of “conservative values” and allowing in other religions’ conservative members like the Coptics would make your party legal and within the bounds of a democratic process. The issues aren’t religion specific then. No more ban.

          • Biff Jay

            Might I also mention that anyone who has been following Egypt can see that it is the secularists who have been bigots. They won’t tolerate even the lightest sprinkling of an Islamic flavor among a few articles in the laws and constitution. In actuality, the Islamists allowed for mostly non-Islamic laws and in the end only were stubborn about the inclusions of a small few. You are trying to make one side sound tolerant and the other is not. The fact is, the secularists won’t even tolerate the word “Islam”, and in a country such as Egypt, secularists are going to have to accept that there will be some Islamic components.

            Considering most Egyptians think Shariah is the best form of legislation, I don’t think the Brotherhood got away with much. Just a few small Islamic inclusions. It was never close to a theocracy, and there’s no way it ever could have become one.

          • Intellectualist

            Your argument is without merit. The drafters have allowed a statement that the laws are derived from Islam, just as in America we have tolerated a judeo-christian source as ours. You can find some good in every correctional program that societies use.

    • Intellectualist

      Only the bigot party like the kind you display is banned.

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