Culture – Daily News Egypt https://dailynewsegypt.com Egypt’s Only Daily Independent Newspaper In English Fri, 15 Jun 2018 21:20:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 Unseen sides of Egypt https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/14/unseen-sides-of-egypt/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/14/unseen-sides-of-egypt/#respond Thu, 14 Jun 2018 13:00:35 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662806 Top pictures posted on Instagram by amateur photographers in Ramadan

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Photography has always been a form of stating reality. It is the window through which people can look into the lives of others and the portrait that displays their daily life events.

While media portals are filled with pictures taken by famous photographers, many unknown talents use tools as simple as their mobile cameras to develop their passion for photography. Those, who have not found a platform on which to publish their photos seek to establish their own outlet by publishing these pictures on their social media accounts.

In an attempt to support young talent seeking a platform, Daily News Egypt publishes pictures taken by citizens displaying their daily activities.

These pictures are the best pictures posted to Instagram thoughout the holy month of Ramadan with the hashtag #DailyNewsEgypt. Each one of them reflects a unique side of Egypt—not mentioned in international media outlets—but that can be seen by the people actually living in the country.

Every month, the best pictures with the hashtag #DailyNewsEgypt will be reposted on the newspaper’s official account and published in the printed edition.

Daily News Egypt’s editorial team found that the published pictures represent the work of extremely talented young photographers. Moreover, they capture moments of pure beauty people rarely stop to enjoy amid the hurry of their daily routine.

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Hints of Arab culture abound in Portugal’s Algarve https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/13/hints-of-arab-culture-abound-in-portugals-algarve/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/13/hints-of-arab-culture-abound-in-portugals-algarve/#respond Wed, 13 Jun 2018 14:46:37 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662706 While most people associate Andalusia with Spain, an important stretch of what was once the northernmost part of the Arab World was also located in what is today’s Portugal. Though Arab rule extended even to the north of Portugal past Lisbon (Lisbun to the Arabs), the best remnants of Islamic civilisation in Spain can be seen …

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While most people associate Andalusia with Spain, an important stretch of what was once the northernmost part of the Arab World was also located in what is today’s Portugal. Though Arab rule extended even to the north of Portugal past Lisbon (Lisbun to the Arabs), the best remnants of Islamic civilisation in Spain can be seen on a trip to the remote region of Algarve, one of the most scenic regions of Spain. For tourists looking for a unique Mediterranean culture with echoes of the Arab past, Algarve is not to be missed.

  

The name Algarve is a corruption of the former Arabic name for the region “Al Gharb” (The West). The area is the most Western part of continental Europe. Even today, centuries later, there is plenty that is evocative of Andalusian glory—from Arabic loan words to Portuguese to the culinary touches that can be found in the regional markets.

The region is home to Islamic monuments that date to the middle ages. The region is increasingly embracing this unique historical heritage. The town of Tavira is home to an Islamic museum. Silves, once the Arab capital of the region, has hosted a centre for Portuguese-Arab studies since 2004.

During my trip to the region, I discovered plenty of Arab cultures just under the surface. Regional markets in Algarve include touches of Arab architecture. For example, in their use of domes and arches. The terms for seafood like the Portuguese language itself includes several loan words: savel from shabal and tuna from the Arabic al-tun. The seafood market is often close to the farmers market where many products introduced by the Arab world continue to be sold including apricots, almonds, and carobs.

“In Portugal, we have grown carob for centuries but we don’t make juice out of it, at least we don’t anymore, so this was re-introduced to us,” said Ricardo Melo, the food and beverage manager of the Anantara Vilamoura Algarve resort. “We had a member of our staff from Egypt who helped us come up with this juice.”

The hotel, the most luxurious in the region, is ideally located in the heart of the Algarve, an ideal base to explore the area littered with monuments of past kingdoms. Today, the region is home to royalty of a different kind.  

 

For football fans, Former FC Barcelona great Luis Figo has a restaurant in the town of Vilamoura. Not far away are Roman ruins that sit next to a night club owned by Portuguese football star Cristiano Ronaldo. The club is—almost predictably—named Seven Vilamoura, after Ronaldo’s jersey number. The famed striker loves the region and has a private residence located not all that far from the hotel in a neighbourhood where many of the local buildings still have intricate Arab-influenced chimneys for which the region is famous. 

On a walk through Vilamoura’s old town, it is easy to spot other architectural features more common to the Southern Mediterranean on streets that would not feel out of place in the kasbah’s of Morocco or Algeria. For those who prefer more active holidays, surfing and other beach sports are readily available. The region’s best golf course is also located on the edge of the Anantara Algarve Vilamoura—the Oceânico Victoria Golf designed by Golf legend Arnold Palmer. It hosts the Portuguese Masters.

Not to be missed on any trip to Portugal is the pastel de nata, small custard tarts which are the go-to Portuguese breakfast pastry. The pastel de nata at one of the region’s bakeries, Pastelaria Beira Mar, in Quarteira is the best in the region—if not Portugal.

The day before I left, however, I didn’t have to venture fat from the Anantara Vilamoura Algarve for a taste of the local culture. In the intriguing lobby dominated by a large indoor tree, I enjoyed a fado performance. In this traditional Portuguese style of music, a singer is accompanied by a stringed instrument. From the manner in which the guitar is plucked to the particular use of repetition, some have found in it Arab musical influences. The Portuguese lyrics have just a hint of melancholy—enough to make you long for your next trip to the Algarve. 

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Ramadan in the Comoros https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/13/ramadan-in-the-comoros/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/13/ramadan-in-the-comoros/#respond Wed, 13 Jun 2018 14:44:43 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662711 The Comoros is a small African-Arab Islamic country consisting of a group of islands in the Strait of Mozambique in the Indian Ocean. The official languages of the Comoros are Comorian, French, and Arabic. Comorian (or Shikomoro) is a Bantu language closely related to Swahili. About 86% of the Comorian population is Muslim. The Arabs …

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The Comoros is a small African-Arab Islamic country consisting of a group of islands in the Strait of Mozambique in the Indian Ocean.

The official languages of the Comoros are Comorian, French, and Arabic. Comorian (or Shikomoro) is a Bantu language closely related to Swahili. About 86% of the Comorian population is Muslim.
The Arabs named it Comoros in the early second century. The name was derived from the Arabic word “qamar” (moon).

With fewer than a million people, the Comoros is one of the least populous countries in the world but is also one of the most densely populated.


Muslims in the Comoros start celebrating Ramadan from the beginning of Shaaban, the month that precedes Ramadan. They restore, paint, and decorate mosques, including changing old lamps with new ones, so that the mosques can be ready to receive worshippers throughout the holy month.


As is customary in the Comoros, the people hold weddings in Shaaban, so that couples can initiate their marriage in the holy month and have its blessings. Also, the elders of the villages gather to settle any personal or family conflicts.


The Muslims in the Comoros fast for 12 and a half hours during Ramadan, which is the shortest fasting period in an Arab country.


One of the special nights in the Comoros is the night of sighting the Ramadan crescent, when the people take to the streets holding torches and head to the coasts where the light of their torches reflects on the water. After the Ramadan crescent is sighted, the people start banging drums, celebrating the start of Ramadan and stay awake until the time of suhoor.


During the month of Ramadan, the Muslims of the Comoros become like one family. Before the fast-breaking meal, iftar, they head to mosques with different types of food. They hold large banquets in front of the mosques and invite the poor to eat with them.


In the month of Ramadan, the government bans casinos and criminalises wearing revealing clothes for women. Anyone who violates those rules is imprisoned or fined.


All mosques in the Comoros hold sermons after the Asr prayer (afternoon prayer) during the holy month to interpret the Quran.


Tharid is a traditional popular Arab dish consumed in the holy month of Ramadan. It is made of pieces of bread in a vegetable or meat broth. Other dishes include taros, potatoes, sambousa, meat, and fish.

As an appetiser, they eat soup with grinned rice and meat. There is also a famous dish called ntrovi ya nazi, which consists of fried or steamed fish with cooked bananas and coconut stew.


At night, after the Tarawih prayers, people gather to listen to sermons. The suhoor meal consists of rice with milk or crab and vegetables, as well as tea.

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Nobel literature scandal deepens as Jean-Claude Arnault is charged with rape https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/nobel-literature-scandal-deepens-as-jean-claude-arnault-is-charged-with-rape/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/nobel-literature-scandal-deepens-as-jean-claude-arnault-is-charged-with-rape/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 14:42:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662640 The post Nobel literature scandal deepens as Jean-Claude Arnault is charged with rape appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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A Swedish state prosecutor has brought two charges of rape against the man at the center of a scandal that has forced the Swedish Academy to cancel the award of the Nobel Prize for literature in 2018.Well-known photographer Jean-Claude Arnault is now facing charges of rape, Swedish prosecutors announced on Tuesday, over six months after 18 women publicly accused him of harassing or raping them in Sweden’s reputable Dagens Nyheter newspaper.

The charges are the result of a preliminary investigation into the allegations against Arnault, who is married to the poet Katarina Frostenson, a member of the Swedish Academy that manages the Nobel Prize in Literature.

District prosecutor Christina Voigt said on Tuesday that Arnault had been charged with two counts of rape against a woman in Stockholm in 2011.

The woman’s attorney, Elisabeth Massi Fritz, told the dpa German news agency in a statement that her client was “relieved and satisfied” with the decision to press charges.

“My assessment is that evidence is robust,” Voigt said in a statement.

Allegations denied

The 71-year-old Arnault denies these charges, as well as separate claims that he leaked the names of Nobel prize-winners ahead of the official announcement.

“He maintains that he is completely innocent of the allegations,” Bjorn Hurtig, Arnault’s lawyer, told Reuters on Tuesday.

“I do not share the prosecutor’s view that the evidence is robust. Accounts differ, there is no technical evidence, there are no direct witness accounts and the events are a long time in the past.”

Read more: Opinion: Literature Nobel Prize delay gives Swedish Academy time to think

Prosecutors closed another preliminary investigation into other abuse allegations against Arnault made in March due to insufficient evidence and expiration of the statute of limitations.

In addition to harassment and rape accusations, Swedish media also claimed Arnault bullied his victims into silence by threatening to use his contacts with the Academy and other influential people to “blacklist” them.

The scandal prompted eight academics to de facto resign from the Swedish Academy, a post that had previously been awarded for life. Faced with the outcry further fueled by the #MeToo movement, the committee decided to postpone awarding the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2018, announcing it would be awarding two in 2019 instead, as it needed time to restore public trust.

The academy is in recess until September, but at present only 10 of the 18 members are active, while four seats are vacant following recent resignations in the wake of the scandal.

sb/eg (dpa, Reuters)

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Croation author Ivana Sajko wins International Literature Award https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/croation-author-ivana-sajko-wins-international-literature-award/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/croation-author-ivana-sajko-wins-international-literature-award/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 13:33:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662673 The post Croation author Ivana Sajko wins International Literature Award appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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The major literary award for a work of fiction translated into German goes to a Croatian novel. Sajko’s Love Story has been praised for revealing “the power and impotence” of individuals in the globalized age.Having been whittled down to a shortlist of six authors, the 10th edition of the International Literature Prize for international prose translated into German for the first time goes to a Croatian author, Ivana Sajko, for her novel Liebesroman (Love novel), the jury announced on Tuesday.

The story of a young artist couple living with a child in a nation that is coming apart, the novel “is about the power and impotence of the individual in our globalized present,” said the jury. While the male protagonist is intoxicated with his own ideas, she is plagued by existential fears and the unnamed couple soon begin to fall rapidly out of love — the true essence of the book’s title.

“Ivana Sajko’s tells of a world in agony, of how political systems encroach on lives, put people under pressure, and slowly poison the personal,” said the jury of the Croatian-set work, adding that the story could take place anywhere.

The novel was translated by Alida Bremer, a renowned translator of Croatian literature into German who will receive €15,000 ($17,685) for her efforts; the author will get €20,000 ($23,579) for an award that will likely lead to further foreign language translations.

Read more: International Literature Award goes to Fiston Mwanza Mujila’s ‘Tram 83’

Born 1975 in Zagreb, Croatia, Ivana Sajko is not only an author but also writes and directs plays for the theater. The co-editor of the Frakcija art magazine, Sajko is known for her critical and political writing that is firmly anchored in southeastern Europe — even if she lives and works in Berlin.

From the shortlist announced last month, Sajko beat out two English titles, including Eliot Weinberger’s The Ghost of Birds, and The Story of a Brief Marriage by Sri Lankan-based novelist Anuk Arudpragasam.

The award ceremony will take place on June 28 at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin.

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Study reveals zar rituals still heavily performed in Upper Egypt https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/study-reveals-zar-rituals-still-heavily-performed-in-upper-egypt/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/study-reveals-zar-rituals-still-heavily-performed-in-upper-egypt/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 13:00:41 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662503 Cultural performance attendees seek to rid ‘demon spirits’ invading their souls

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People in Cairo only know about “zar” as a folkloric musical ritual that used to be held in Egypt years ago, the only remaining part of which is through the band Mazaher. However, a recent study revealed that zar is still being heavily performed in several governorates in Upper Egypt, including Luxor and Aswan.

The study, conducted by Luxor Centre for Studies, Development, and Dialogue said that the folkloric ritual that is culturally believed to exorcise “demon spirits” invading humans is still performed on a regular basis in some of Upper Egypt’s villages, using the same methods that used to be utilised hundreds of years ago.

Zar is a traditional ceremony that was first introduced to Egypt in the early 19th century and soon spread into rural areas. Through circles of women dancing to the rhythms of heavy drum beats and chanting calls for the love of God and need of help. The practice is deeply believed to cure abnormal behaviours and symptoms that people have with no known medical reasoning, instead blaming them on evil spirits.

Through a number of ceremonies, held on a regular basis, chickens are slaughtered as a form of sacrifice to God, and the person seeking to be healed is covered with its blood from head to toe. Over the years, the cultural phenomenon began to fade, leaving only a limited number of people still believing in it.

The study revealed that women in the villages studied acknowledged the existence of the practice. However, zar is still held secretly in certain places that are known to them, and women diagnosed with unfamiliar health conditions, especially older ones, attend zars regularly, where its believed that certain performed songs, drums, and chants drive out the dark devils living inside of them.

According to state-run media outlet Al-Ahram, women with unfamiliar illnesses who could not be medically diagnosed or treated head to the women-only gatherings, where they sing, dance to certain known rhythms, and call God by different names, seeking relief and healing.

Some of the attending women were quoted saying, according to Al-Ahram, that the zar rituals they attend are more or less like massive weddings, where hundreds of females all wearing white gowns gather and dance in circles to songs that are only performed at similar events.

The folkloric ritual is usually held near ancient temples, with the female attendees from different villages coming all the way specially to seek treatment.

The ceremonies were described as huge and being prepared for weeks in advance. One of the quoted ladies said that there are two main female bands that hold these events in the area.

Mazaher is currently the only zar band still performing in Cairo. The modernised version of zar, which takes place at Makan cultural centre, is far from the traditional zar still performed in Upper Egypt.

The amended version of zar, currently performed in Cairo, is a mix of cultural, folkloric Sufi chanting of the love of Gods and nature. It does not seek any sort of treatment for the attendees and it is performed as a form of curing spiritual discomfort.

The band has a large fan base who continuously attend their concerts to enjoy the tempo and the lyrics of the songs.

The start of the practice in Egypt was not documented in any of the books studying the case. Books documented that it first entered Egypt from Ethiopia and Sudan.   

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Ramadan in Thailand https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/ramadan-in-thailand/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/ramadan-in-thailand/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 12:00:01 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662490 Thailand in located in Southeast Asia and was known as Siam until 11 May 1949. Thai means “free” in the Thai language. Opinions vary on the percentage of Muslims in Thailand, but some say they represent about 5-10% of its total population. Muslims are largely present in Southern Thailand. Their origins date back to the …

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Thailand in located in Southeast Asia and was known as Siam until 11 May 1949. Thai means “free” in the Thai language.

Opinions vary on the percentage of Muslims in Thailand, but some say they represent about 5-10% of its total population.

Muslims are largely present in Southern Thailand. Their origins date back to the early Arab and Indian merchants who travelled there since the 12th century.

These Muslims are Malay and speak the Bahasa language. It is written in Arabic letters.

When Shaaban starts, Muslims there start memorising the Quran in sessions that are held throughout the month up until the final test. When Ramadan starts, those who memorised best are announced and allowed to recite the Quran in mosques throughout Ramadan.

It is not unusual to see an opening of a new mosque in every city and village during Ramadan. Muslims collect money to build the mosques, and some even contribute to building it themselves.

A religious custom in Thailand is carrying those who memorised the Quran on people’s shoulders in happy gatherings to celebrate them. They walk around carrying them to give an example to the rest of the Muslims and encourage them to memorise the Quran as well.

In Ramadan, mosques are lit, and decorations are hung. Even non-Muslims feel like there is a big event occurring and a very sacred occasion to celebrate. Thailand has about 3,494 mosques, including 180 in the capital Bangkok alone. 

When it is time for iftar in Thailand, big drums are beaten. The person who beats these drums is usually referred to as “Bilal”.

In Ramadan, family members gather around the head of the family, whether it is the father, grandfather, or grandmother. Everybody gathers around the table during iftar. Some people have their iftar in mosques as women arrive there carrying different kinds of foods right before the adhan (call to prayer) for Maghrib (sunset). Ramadan is seen as an opportunity for a family to get together and spend nights practicing religious rituals.

Charities in Thailand collect personal donations to hold group iftars in Ramadan and help the needy throughout the month.

On the first day of Ramadan, each family must sacrifice a cattle head in celebration of the holy month. Poorer families sacrifice birds. This is an old Thai tradition that has been practiced for centuries.

Before iftar, women go out in groups and sit in front of one of their homes and have iftar together, while men do not eat the food their wives cooked, but instead eat the food cooked by other men’s wives. Muslims are keen on eating plenty of vegetables and do not consume many sweets. The Muslim Thai community loves a type of cake made of rice and milk and specifically prefer to have it at suhoor. 

Iftar starts with dates (usually imported from Egypt and Saudi Arabia) with milk, some juices, and snacks. Then Muslims perform their prayers and go back to finishing their iftar.

At iftar, Thai tables, like the case in all Muslim countries, are filled with different kinds of foods and sweets, but the most remarkable thing about this month is that no home makes different kinds of foods, but rather make large amounts of the same type and everybody distributes what they make to everybody else so that each table ends up with dozens of types of foods.

Each family is keen on visiting the rest of its members who may have moved away. Some of them stay for a few days at their relatives’ homes.

Before suhoor, young people and children stand outside their houses with fruits as well as carry lanterns made of tree bark and lit with oil, making them look more like torches.

When it is suhoor time, the streets are empty.

People believe that on Lailat Al-Qadr (Night of Power) there are clear universal signs, and that if you see one of those signs and you say a prayer, whatever you ask for will be accepted and God will respond to one of your prayers. 

   

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Prestigious Peace Prize of the German Book Trade goes to Aleida and Jan Assmann https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/prestigious-peace-prize-of-the-german-book-trade-goes-to-aleida-and-jan-assmann-2/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/prestigious-peace-prize-of-the-german-book-trade-goes-to-aleida-and-jan-assmann-2/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 10:37:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662573 The post Prestigious Peace Prize of the German Book Trade goes to Aleida and Jan Assmann appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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The German academic duo have been selected for cultural writings that have promoted “sustainable peace and understanding among the peoples of the world.” They will be receiving the award at the Frankfurt book fair.German writers and scholars Aleida and Jan Assmann are the latest recipients of the €25,000 ($29,500) Peace Prize of the German Book Trade, it was announced in Berlin on Tuesday.

A literary and cultural studies scholar, Aleida Assmann “has displayed an unfaltering commitment to investigating the virulent and perennial themes of historical amnesia and memory culture,” said the peace prize jury in a statement. “Time and again, her work has illustrated that an open and honest handling of the past is an essential precondition for peaceful coexistence.”

A recent publication in her large and celebrated body of work is the 2016 title, Shadows of Trauma. Memory and Politics of Postwar Identity.

Jan Assman, Aleida’s husband, is meanwhile an Egyptologist and cultural studies scholar who has “launched international debates on fundamental questions relating to the cultural and religious conflicts of our time,” the jury said of works including his seminal 1997 publication, Moses the Egyptian: The Memory of Egypt in Western Monotheism.

“His extensive scientific work has examined the relationship between religion and violence, the genesis of intolerance and the claim to absolute truth, all of which have made an indispensable contribution to our understanding of the willingness and capacity for peace held by religions in today’s global society,” the jury statement added.

The jury further commented on the couple’s “exhilarating and mutually enhancing unity,” throughout their scholarly collaborations, which was also recognized last year when Aleida and Jan Assmann together won the 2017 Balzan Prize for Collective Memory for their “shared, inter- and transdisciplinary elaboration of the concept of cultural memory.” Other prizes the couple have won in unison include the 2017 Karl Jaspers Prize.

Read more: Nobel Prize in literature will not be awarded in 2018: Swedish Academy

‘Peace, humanity and understanding’

The German Publishers and Booksellers Association has gifted the Peace Prize — which is comprised entirely of donations from booksellers and publishers — annually to those who uphold the German book trade’s commitment “to peace, humanity and understanding among all peoples and nations of the world,” while the winners “are chosen without any reference to their national, racial or religious background.”

In 2017, Canadian author Margaret Atwood, known for novels including the dystopian classic The Handmaid’s Tale, now a major TV series, was awarded the prize for her “political intuition and clairvoyance when it comes to dangerous underlying trends and currents.”

The 2016 recipient of the prestigious prize was German journalist and author Carolin Emcke, who has written and reported widely from war zones and crisis regions.

The 2018 award ceremony will take place on Sunday, October 14, 2018, the final day of the Frankfurt Book Fair, at the Church of St. Paul in Frankfurt am Main — the site where the Frankfurt National Assembly was formed in 1848 at the height of the democratic revolutions.

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11 of our favorite football films https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/11-of-our-favorite-football-films/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/12/11-of-our-favorite-football-films/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:49:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662583 The post 11 of our favorite football films appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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Hooligans and Iranian women heading to the stadium, Maradona and Pelé showcasing their skills: To get in the mood ahead of the 2018 FIFA World Cup, here are 11 of our favorite soccer movies.On june 14, Russia will kick off the 2018 World Cup by facing Saudi Arabia during the first match of the football competition. Meanwhile, you can get into the spirit by watching some of the best soccer movies ever made.

The Goalie’s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick, by Wim Wenders (Germany, 1971) is a rather spartan film about the last man on the field. While Wenders has described the movie as his debut, it also marked his breakthrough. The story itself is quite sad: After having been thrown out as a result of a foul, a goalkeeper wanders around Vienna, where he ends up committing a murder. Adapted from the novel with the same title by Peter Handke, who also co-wrote the script, the film strikes viewers with its calmness and laconism — qualities that good goalkeepers should adopt.

Soccer fans and hooligans

There are two particularly tough films about soccer fans that shouldn’t be missed.

Ultra, by Ricky Tognazzi (Italy, 1990), is a drama dealing with hooliganism. The Italian director focused on the ultras of the Rome-based club AS Roma, which give the Juventus Turino fans a severe beating. At the 1991 Berlin International Film Festival, the film was awarded a Silver Bear.

Two years later, Adolf Winkelmann received the German Film Prize for Best Director for his soccer film Nordkurve (Germany, 1993), which takes a critical look at the football scene in Germany’s industrial Ruhr region, including fans and managers, players and their wives.

Light and exhilarating entertainment

In Fimpen, by Bo Widerberg (Sweden, 1973), a little boy stirs up the Swedish national team, and enjoys more success than Zlatan Ibrahimovic has had in France.

And in Gregory’s Girl, by Scotsman Bill Forsyth (Britain, 1981), a teenager is moderately successful at soccer, but also dreams of other things — namely, girls. Soccer and love do not always match up.

The world’s top soccer stars in film

Escape to Victory — or just Victory — by John Huston (USA, 1981, top picture) is set in occupied France during World War II. In a Nazi-run prisoners’ camp, a match is organized between German soldiers, and British and American prisoners of war. While Victory is not exactly a highlight in the brilliant career of American star director John Huston, which other soccer film can pride itself in having soccer legend Pelé among its stars?

In Maradona (France, 2008), eccentric Serbian director Emir Kusturica features Argentinean soccer idol Diego Maradona, a player who could likely single-handedly take on a whole opposing team.

International relations and gender issues through football

Far beyond both Pelé and Maradona, The Other Final, by Johan Kramer (Netherlands/Japan, 2003), is a rather quiet film focusing on two of the lowest ranking national teams in the world: Bhutan and Montserrat. They played against each other on June 30, 2002, the same day Germany played against Brazil during the World cup in Brazil. Bhutan won 4:0. But what certainly counted much more was that the game helped improve relations between the two countries.

Offside, by Jafar Panahi (Iran, 2006), has been banned in Iran. In the film, director Jafar Panahi shows women and girls trying to get into a stadium in order to watch a World Cup football match — which is strictly forbidden due to their sex. Panahi’s film is both lovely and razor-sharp.

Another work featuring Bhutan: The Cup, by Khyentse Norbu, is a Bhutanese-Australian co-production from 1999. Norbu is not only a director, but also a monk, and shows in his film that football and spirituality are compatible with each other. His main protagonist wears a Ronaldo jersey underneath his frock.

In Hothead, by Jean-Jacques Annaud (France, 1979), French actor Patrick Dewaere plays the luckless footballer Francois Perrin. He gets involved in the criminal ploys of a provincial club. But there is a happy end with Perrin shooting two goals, liberating himself from the bonds of the managers.

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2,000-year-old burial complex discovered near Sea of Galilee https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/11/2000-year-old-burial-complex-discovered-near-sea-of-galilee/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/11/2000-year-old-burial-complex-discovered-near-sea-of-galilee/#respond Mon, 11 Jun 2018 13:29:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662447 The post 2,000-year-old burial complex discovered near Sea of Galilee appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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Israeli construction workers unearthed a cave in Tiberias which was likely a family burial space from Roman times.Construction workers using a digger exposed what appeared to be an ancient burial site some 10 meters (33 feet) underground while working in Tiberias, a city in northern Israel located on the Sea of Galilee, a spokesperson from Israel’s Antiquities Authority confirmed on Monday.

The space is some two meters high and includes an entranceway as well as the central chamber containing more than 10 grave niches. “The cave must have been a burial space for a family living in Tiberias or a neighboring village,” said spokesperson Yair Amitsur, adding that the discovery is “virtually one-of-a-kind” for this area.

The craftsmanship on the limestone is of high quality, she said, with meticulous decoration and engravings in Greek, leading researchers to believe that the family was wealthy. The entranceway is plastered over in color.

The chamber also contains decorated chests of stone and ceramics, in which the bones of the deceased were placed. The grave niches were used multiple times.

According to Israel’s Antiquities Authority, Tiberias was founded 2,000 years ago, in the year 18 A.D., and named after Roman Emerorer Tiberius.

als/eg (dpa, KNA)

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Ramadan in Pakistan https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/11/ramadan-in-pakistan/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/11/ramadan-in-pakistan/#respond Mon, 11 Jun 2018 13:00:20 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662341 Like millions of other Muslims around the world, people in Pakistan observe the month of Ramadan with traditional fervour and zeal. With millions of Muslims in the country who do not eat from sunrise to sunset, with the exception of those who are exempt for certain reasons, Pakistan is one of the countries where citizens, …

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Like millions of other Muslims around the world, people in Pakistan observe the month of Ramadan with traditional fervour and zeal.

With millions of Muslims in the country who do not eat from sunrise to sunset, with the exception of those who are exempt for certain reasons, Pakistan is one of the countries where citizens, even the exempt ones, are not allowed to eat in public.

Restaurants usually remain closed during the daytime until before the Maghrib (sunset) prayer, except at the places frequented by travellers or sick people, like hotels, train stations, or inter-city bus stops.

Keeping in mind the tenets of Islam, people also demonstrate their generosity by offering free iftars to the needy.

People cherish Ramadan and relish everything about the holy month, from suhoor meals to iftar and from family get-togethers to helping those who are in need.

As for their eating rituals, Pakistani Muslims usually break their fast with dates and fresh drinks before dinner.

The most traditional suhoor, known there as sehri, includes the locally made fine noodles called pheni, while a popular iftar drink includes aromatic flower extract syrups called sharbat.

Ramadan is the month of strengthening social ties among all Muslims. In Pakistan, Ramadan is an occasion when family and friends get together to spend quality time and revive the richest traditions of their culture. Families and friends, who are usually busy with their daily lives and mundane chores, invite each other over for iftar dinners, making it an opportunity for families and friends to socialise and reunite.

Mosques display a festive aura as people illuminate them with decorative lights on walls and minarets. Courtyards of mosques are filled with worshippers who flock for congregational prayers of Ishaa, which are followed by Tarawih and Tahajjud prayers. Religious leaders preach special sermons during the whole month. Recitation of the entire Quran during Tarawih prayers is a ritual at every mosque. During the last 10 days of the holy month, people observe Itekaab, which is a kind of meditation/contemplation and an effort to please God, leaving all mundane chores aside.

Women at home prepare traditional special cuisine such as chicken tikka, kebab, biryani, keema karela, pakora, and fruit salad, to name a few. While mothers are busy making food in their kitchens, young girls remain at the iftar tables to help prepare the food. It gets more festive for the young members of the family to pop into the kitchen and see what is being cooked for them. The most admired dish is pakora, a fried mixture made up of gram lentil flour, potatoes, and onions. Pakora fruit chaats, dates, special rose syrup drink, and channa chaat, a chickpea salad, are popular fast-breaking items at iftar tables. Regular meals at iftar tables include biryani, spicy rice with meat, chicken khorma, a gravy dish, and haleem, a slow-cooked stew of meat and meat balls. people also feast on food brought from street stalls. Before the Maghrib prayer, Mosque’s courtyards are filled with people who have come to pray and break their fast. Communal meals are served to feed the hungry and poor families of the locality.

During fasting, most restaurants remain closed and are reopened at iftar time. However, businesses function as normal. Opening and closing hours of business and offices are adjusted accordingly. For foreigners, hotels have special arrangements and food is available for them at all times. Shops are usually remained open until late in the night. Drummers roam streets and bang their instruments to announce the pre-dawn meal, called sehri. Famous pre-dawn meals include paratha, yoghurt, vermicelli, and lassi, a dairy drink.

Ramadan brings special joy for children who join their families in observing fasting for the first time. Their success becomes a source of pride for their parents. On the last night of Ramadan, a special tradition of get-togethers happens, called Chaand Raat, which means night of the moon sighting. After the final iftar, women and girls flock to the local markets to buy colourful bangles and paint their hands and feet with henna designs.

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New "Loreley" promotes iconic World Heritage on the Rhine https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/11/new-loreley-promotes-iconic-world-heritage-on-the-rhine/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/11/new-loreley-promotes-iconic-world-heritage-on-the-rhine/#respond Mon, 11 Jun 2018 10:51:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662455 The post New "Loreley" promotes iconic World Heritage on the Rhine appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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The romantic Rhine rock Loreley in the Upper Middle Rhine Valley has a new representative: Tasmin Sophie Fetz (19) thus realizes a childhood dream according to her own statement.As a child, her nickname was Loreley, said the future chemical laboratory assistant from Dörscheid. On the rock plateau high above St. Goarshausen, the epitome of Rhine romanticism and a hotspot of day tourism, she was presented to the press and public as the 17th Loreley and ambassador of the legendary Upper Middle Rhine Valley World Heritage Site. Her predecessor Theresa Lambrich had given up the title after three years.

According to Loreley Tourism, the Loreley’s job is comparable to that of a wine queen. There are about 50 assignments per year. Applicants should be “flexible in time, mobile and of course blonde”. Good knowledge of the region, sociability, charm and quick-wittedness are important.

The mermaid of the same name plays a central role in historical Loreley statements. Heinrich Heine had them comb their golden hair in a poem and twist the heads of sailors so that they ran against reefs.

is/ks (dpa)

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Ramadan in Morocco https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/10/ramadan-in-morocco/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/10/ramadan-in-morocco/#respond Sun, 10 Jun 2018 11:00:37 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=662196 “Awasher Mubaraka” (happy first 10 days of Ramadan) is a greeting usually said by the people of Morocco during the first days of Ramadan or at the beginning of any religious occasion. By these words, the Moroccans congratulate each other on the beginning of Ramadan. The Moroccans receive the month of “obedience” with cannons shooting …

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“Awasher Mubaraka” (happy first 10 days of Ramadan) is a greeting usually said by the people of Morocco during the first days of Ramadan or at the beginning of any religious occasion.

By these words, the Moroccans congratulate each other on the beginning of Ramadan. The Moroccans receive the month of “obedience” with cannons shooting and women’s ululation (high-pitched tongue trill). At the beginning of the holy month, the Moroccan women prepare delicious sweets, and families flock to the main streets of Moroccan cities where celebrations start after the Tarawih prayers and continue until dawn.
They decorate streets and houses to look their best. Moroccans are keen to perform prayers in mosques, especially Tarawih, as mosques always become crowded with worshippers during the holy month. Mosques prepare schedules of activities that last from dawn until late at night. They organise sermons after the Zuhr (noon) prayer, while the time following the Asr (late afternoon) prayer is devoted to Quran recitation in large groups.
There is a famous habit in Morocco before Ramadan, as they choose the imams who will lead the prayers in major mosques in the country during the holy month. Hassan II Mosque, located in Casablanca, is the largest mosque in Morocco and the second largest in Africa. People from all regions flock to Hassan II Mosque to perform Tarawih prayers. Omar Al-Kazabri, a famous imam, usually leads the prayers at Hassan II Mosque. He was ranked among the 50 most influential Moroccan figures.
There is a common tradition in Morocco called the “Ramadan Hassaniyah sermons”. It was initiated by the late King of Morocco Hassan II. It is a series of sermons delivered before the king by the most important religious men and preachers in the world. Sitting King Mohammed VI continues to follow the same tradition of Hassaniyah sermons, which are currently held at the Royal Palace or at Hassan II Mosque.
In Morocco, the month of Ramadan allows an opportunity for families to meet and exchange social visits. Married members of the same families meet at the family home, or what they call the “Big House” on Fridays in Ramadan. There is another beautiful tradition in Ramadan, when parents celebrate the first fasting for their children. They prepare a special iftar (fast-breaking meal), consisting of delicious Moroccan dishes, besides milk, dates, and dry fruits.
Moroccans celebrate the 15th night of Ramadan by reciting Quran in mosques and women prepare couscous dishes or desserts to distribute among the poor and worshippers in mosques.
Another Ramadan custom in Morocco is the celebration of Laylat Al-Qadr (Night of Power) which is usually observed by the Moroccans on the 26th night of the holy month. On that occasion, the Moroccans wear traditional costumes and organise horse parades.
Moroccan cuisine is one of the most famous in the world. They start their iftar meal by eating dates and drinking milk. After the Maghrib (sunset) prayer, they eat harira, a traditional soup always served as a starter during Ramadan. The main dishes are served after Taraweh prayer, such as tajine and couscous. Morocco is known for its dates, especially “medjool” dates, which are very expensive.

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Ramadan in Philippines https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/07/ramadan-in-philippines/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/07/ramadan-in-philippines/#respond Thu, 07 Jun 2018 09:00:29 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661915 The Philippines is located in the Far East in the Pacific Ocean. The archipelago consists of 7,000 islands. Each has mountains, plains, and forests, in addition to the world’s largest coasts, with a large number of lakes, rivers, springs, and streams. Filipino Muslims are called Moro. It is the name the Spanish gave to the …

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The Philippines is located in the Far East in the Pacific Ocean. The archipelago consists of 7,000 islands. Each has mountains, plains, and forests, in addition to the world’s largest coasts, with a large number of lakes, rivers, springs, and streams.

Filipino Muslims are called Moro. It is the name the Spanish gave to the Muslims of the Philippines, as the first people to resist the Spanish were the Muslims of Morocco, so the name stuck. When the Spanish entered southern Philippines, the saw the same resistance from residents there, hence, they were called Moro.

Currently, Muslims in the Philippines constitute 10% of the population.

Muslims there eagerly await Ramadan as an opportunity to emphasise their Islamic identity and maintain it. Given the large number of the Muslims of the Philippines of Arab origin, the traditions of Ramadan in the Philippines are greatly affected by their Arab roots.

Some of these traditions include decorations and lightings in mosques, as well as performing Tarawih prayers.

Muslims there seek to make mosques a place of meeting other Muslims and offering aid to the needy. The rich also host the poor at their tables, seeing everyone as brothers in Islam. The imams of mosques work to collect the Zakat (alms) and distributing it among the poor.

Masjid Dimaukom is one of the most important mosques for the Muslims of the Philippines in Ramadan, as they gather and worship there. Children also sit in Quran sessions to read the Quran together.

As for iftar in the Philippines, it starts with having the favourite beverage which consists of bananas, sugar, and coconut milk, then curry, which is made of meat and spices. Afterwards, they have the “si-yuan-suan” dish, which is made of either fish or meat. Then there are some sweets that look like qatayef and apricot juice.

Filipino food is the aggregate of great seafood and food collected from crops and forests, in addition to the effect of other cuisines coming from China, Spain, Mexico, the US, and other countries.

There are many famous local dishes prepared for iftar in the Philippines, such as a rice dish named “pagas” or “cornig”. One of the most famous fish dishes is made of cooked fish and soup. Another includes fried fish. As for the favourite fish dish, it is known as “tilavia”. The Filipinos also like having a sweet dish named “doodle”, and another named “tiatag” and “tamarkotsi”.

Once iftar is over, Muslims rush to mosques to perform the Isha prayers. Afterwards, recital sessions are held, concluded with Tarawih prayers.

As for children, they go out after iftar wearing colourful clothes and carrying Ramadan lanterns, singing songs, and forming teams. Each team receives worshippers with chants and songs in the nearest mosques.

They then roam near the houses close to mosques and remain that way until suhoor, when they wake people up to have their suhoor.

In most cases, the food you see on iftar tables is the same you see at suhoor tables, with some sweets looking like Egyptian qatayef, known as “ayam”. They also drink lemon juice and apricot juice. Some other famous foods at suhoor include jah, paulo, and custard, which is made of flour, cream, sugar, and eggs.

The Filipinos are known to visit one another during Ramadan. Poorer families spend the entire month moving around from a table to another at the houses of their rich neighbours. Then the rich collect the charity of Ramadan and distribute it among these families.

Then the Sheikh of the mosque distributes these funds whether in a city or a village based on the needs of the recipients.

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Ramadan in Ivory Coast https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/06/ramadan-in-ivory-coast/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/06/ramadan-in-ivory-coast/#respond Wed, 06 Jun 2018 13:00:39 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661794 Ivory Coast, also known as Côte d’Ivoire, is located on the Atlantic coast in West Africa. It is famous for ivory, cocoa, and elephants. Its capital since 1983 has been Yamoussoukro, while Abidjan was the capital before that since 1933, and is still its economic capital. Ivory Coast was named as such because of the …

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Ivory Coast, also known as Côte d’Ivoire, is located on the Atlantic coast in West Africa. It is famous for ivory, cocoa, and elephants. Its capital since 1983 has been Yamoussoukro, while Abidjan was the capital before that since 1933, and is still its economic capital.

Ivory Coast was named as such because of the ivory trade on the coast, as ivory was displayed on the coast to be sold to marine sailors in the Atlantic Ocean.

The climate in Ivory Coast sees only two seasons, which are summer and spring, with high humidity. Muslims make up 40% of the population.

Each West African country has a different name for Ramadan.

In Ivory Coast, the holy month is called “sune kalou,” which means the month of fasting.

As Ramadan approaches, religious lectures and preaching start in mosques in order to educate people on the fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) of fasting. The Supreme Council of Imams in Ivory Coast announces the so-called “Zakat call” for the rich. Through these programmes, mosque leaders are asked to collect financial donations or food, such as rice, sugar, and milk, in order to distribute them in populous areas.

Muslims prepare to receive Ramadan starting in Shaaban, the Islamic month preceding it, as they prepare mosques and prayer rugs. They also light up lamps, clean walls and floors, and burn incense.

One of the most common rituals in Ramadan in Ivory Coast is young people marrying in late Shaaban so that they can spend the month with their wives. As a result, many wedding venues are fully booked in Shaaban.

On 29 Shaaban, the Supreme Council of Imams meets at the grand mosque in the suburb of Cocody in the economic capital Abidjan in order to observe the crescent to announce the start of Ramadan in the country.

In villages, people come out carrying torches, heading to coasts and neighboring villages, beating on drums, and announcing the start of Ramadan. They also beat the drums during suhoor time to wake people up for the pre-fasting meal.

One of the most famous Egyptian clerics in Ivory Coast is Sheikh Abdulbasit Abdulsamad, as mosques play recordings of his voice reciting the Quran before the Magrhib (sunset) prayer.

In Ramadan, the people of Ivory Coast become one family that is brought together for Maghrib prayers in mosques. Afterwards, they start having their iftar.

Iftar is different in Ivory Coast from any other African country, as no one has their iftar at home. Families cook their food and take it to another poor family in order for everyone to have iftar together.

Mostly, iftar is a light meal that varies from an area to another. The dishes “madid”, “tharid”, and soup remain some of the most important foods in Ramadan in Ivory Coast.

The most famous food in Ramadan there is known as “mumi”. It is bread baked in a very distinct way, made of barley, and eaten with an oil from the Ivory Coast. The most famous drinks are hibiscus, ginger, “king’s brain”, and “dajih”, which is a local powder mixed with milk, flour and sugar.

For suhoor, rice, meat, fruits, and citrus are very popular. As for drinks, ginger is the most famous drink and is considered a main one, alongside pineapple, apple, tangerine, and various vegetables. Additionally, people in Ivory Coast love tea and are keen on having it during their suhoor meal.

After having their iftar, worshippers prepare to go to mosques to perform their Isha and Tarawih prayers. Streets become crowded with worshippers, and afterwards, people gather in circles to listen to each other and attend religious lectures.

Lailat Al-Qadr is of great importance there, especially after the people of the country got rid of some bad habits, such as girls going out to perform popular dances known as “korubi” while wearing very little clothing.

However, popular celebrations are still held, and after Tarawih, suhoor begins. Children walk around knocking on people’s doors to be given gifts and money.

On the last night of Ramadan, Muslims have an official holiday and prepare large meals. Tribes gather around to celebrate the ability God granted them to fast in Ramadan.

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Swimming in sewage: Mallorca and the refuse https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/06/swimming-in-sewage-mallorca-and-the-refuse/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/06/swimming-in-sewage-mallorca-and-the-refuse/#respond Wed, 06 Jun 2018 12:07:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661869 The post Swimming in sewage: Mallorca and the refuse appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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The holiday season on Mallorca is on its way. Families from around Europe are looking forward to seaside fun. But there are places where swimming is inadvisable. We find waste and discarded needles.Mallorca is closely associated with white beaches, blue bays and summer swimming. That may hold true in many places, but around Palma, the island’s capital, looks are deceptive – extremely so. Instead of unadulterated holiday enjoyment, under the surface here lurks murky wastewater containing fecal sludge.

“When it rains, the public utilities open the sluices and release untreated sewage straight into the sea,” says Aina Barceló from Portixol, a popular subarb of Palma. “There are bans on that sort of thing in Europe. A private company or private individual would be held liable. Here it just happens.”

Barceló no longer lets her young daughter go into the water here. Instead she travels almost an hour to the beach at a nature reserve. “The water pollution isn’t recognizable at first sight, and in the off-season nobody notices it. In the high season a red flag is raised, but very few beachgoers know why,” continues the Mallorcan woman angrily.

Mallorca’s long-standing sewage problem

However, the Balearic island’s sewage treatment plants are outdated and overextended. They have long been unable to cope with the burden created by the population and massive numbers of tourists. Neus Truyol heads Palma’s municipal water and sewage treatment company. She admits the city has a problem.

“Every time it rains, the sewage treatment plants are overstretched. They can’t absorb all the rainwater, so it mixes with household wastewater,” she explains, saying that the amount that does arrive at the treatment plant is so great that some of the sewage is released unfiltered into the sea.

Many blame the previous conservative regime, which they say did absolutely nothing for years. Early this year, the current left-wing coalition consisting of the Socialist Party PSOE and the local group Més per Mallorca at least managed to get the responsible environment ministry in Madrid to agree to the construction of a new sewage treatment plant. But that will take years – and is a mere drop in the bucket.

The fight against refuse

There were once times when the sea and beaches were still clean. Aina Barcelò grew up in Portixol and remembers waving meadows of sea grass, seahorses and sea urchins in the water. She has had enough of all the refuse and pollution, so she has linked up with conservationists in order to play an active role herself.

Her friend Alice Manson from the environmental organization “Ondine” wants to help and educate people. In school programs, she tries to raise children’s awareness of the problem. In a clean-up project on a section of beach limited to 50 meters in El Arenal, the pupils found 722 microplastic particles and 700 larger pieces of plastic, as well as countless cigarette butts, cotton buds, bottles, bags, toys and discarded sanitary products.

Neus Truyol argues that not all the refuse on Mallorca comes from Mallorca: “Much more is washed up from other countries.” She says the waste comes from ships or from the north African coast, which can be seen from the Arabic writing on it.

The diving organization “Mallorca Blue” counters that she is shirking her responsibility with such assertions. It says a three-month field study has shown that the refuse comes mainly from Mallorca and is washed back onto the beaches by the sea.

A risk to the sea and humans

Environmental activist Alice Manson walks along the beach at Portixol looking downward. Her eyes scan the piles of rubbish. Within a few minutes she has found two insulin syringes in the sand, one of them unsealed and with its needle bent upwards. “Anyone walking barefoot in the sand could have stepped on it,” she says, shaking her head, and calls for both locals and tourists to take responsibility at long last. “It’s not just the job of the sewage treatment system to filter out this refuse. More than anything, it’s up to us to avoid creating it.”

Shelina Marks (dpa)

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German international schools aim to promote language, society and culture https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/06/german-international-schools-aim-to-promote-language-society-and-culture/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/06/german-international-schools-aim-to-promote-language-society-and-culture/#respond Wed, 06 Jun 2018 10:20:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661881 The post German international schools aim to promote language, society and culture appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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Digitization and high-quality education are top of the agenda at this week’s World Congress of German Schools Abroad in Berlin. In addition to experts and politicians, alumni will also be taking part for the first time.From Abu Dhabi to Accra, from Boston to Bogota — the network of German international schools spans the world. But how can this network of 140 schools be strengthened, and how can cooperation between the schools be improved? These are the questions up for discussion at the World Congress of German Schools Abroad, taking place in Berlin from June 6-9.

In previous years, the gathering — which takes place every four years — has been held in Mexico City, Cape Town, Shanghai and, of course, Berlin. This year, it’s back in the German capital for the second time.

Guests at the event, organized by Germany’s Foreign Office, the International Association of German Schools Abroad (WDA) and the Central Agency for Schools Abroad (ZfA), will include Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, as well as representatives of German business, culture and education sectors. For the first time, alumni from several German international schools will also be in attendance.

The festivities will open with a performance by the Humboldt Big Band, from the Deutsche Schule Alexander von Humboldt in Lima, Peru. Later, discussions and workshops will debate various topics: To what extent do schools abroad contribute to schools in Germany? How can educational standards be improved, for example in digitization? How can global cooperation between schools, universities and the economy be strengthened?

Another central topic: the expansion of international sponsorships for the network of German international schools, a goal defined by Germany’s new governing coalition that is to be put in place during this legislative period.

Read more: Education and digitization: Germany should invest in teaching before tech

Career fair for alumni

An important participant is PASCH (“Schools: Partners for the Future”), an initiative of the Foreign Office that is celebrating its 10th anniversary. PASCH was launched by the former foreign minister, now president, Frank-Walter Steinmeier during his first term in office in 2008.

Under the slogan “gemeinsam. lernen. weltweit” (“together. learning. worldwide”), the network of some 2,000 schools and 600,000 students aims to raise interest in the German language, society and culture, and enable young people to build up long-term connections to Germany.

At this week’s congress in Berlin, PASCH is also organizing a career fair for alumni, supported by the ZfD, the Goethe Institute, the German Academic Exchange Service and the Pedagogical Exchange Service (PAD) of the Secretariat of the Conference of Ministers of Culture.

The aim of this week’s congress is to make the potential of German international schools more visible, both at home and abroad. In the era of migration, digitization and international cooperation, the congress also wants to emphasize the significance of culture and international communication while producing “new and future-oriented incentives for networking and international exchange.”

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‘Mawa’ed Al-Rahman’: Sharing food with strangers https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/05/mawaed-al-rahman-sharing-food-with-strangers/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/05/mawaed-al-rahman-sharing-food-with-strangers/#respond Tue, 05 Jun 2018 12:00:53 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661645   One of the most eye-catching sights in Ramadan are “Mawa’ed Al-Rahman”, which literally translates to Tables of the Merciful (God). Passing through almost every neighbourhood in Egypt, by the time the Maghrib (sunset) prayers is called, it is difficult to miss the long, stacked tables of food and drink, which often stretch the entire …

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One of the most eye-catching sights in Ramadan are “Mawa’ed Al-Rahman”, which literally translates to Tables of the Merciful (God). Passing through almost every neighbourhood in Egypt, by the time the Maghrib (sunset) prayers is called, it is difficult to miss the long, stacked tables of food and drink, which often stretch the entire length of a street.

Mawa’ed Al-Rahman are one of the distinguishing aspects of Ramadan in Egypt and are heavily dispersed across the country, with the aim of not leaving a single person, no matter their religion or background, hungry by the time Muslims break their fast.

The meals are prepared by the hands of hundreds of volunteers who spend their day preparing different types of food to serve any passer-by who would like to join them at their iftar for free.

Believing that the month of generosity includes offering food to any person in need, Mawa’ed Al-Rahman are organised daily for the whole month.

The tables are usually filled with different types of juices, food, and water.

Some of the districts allocate certain streets to be closed, with the acceptance of the residents, to turn into one huge table that serves every passer-by.

In the past, Mawa’ed Al-Rahman used to be organised with the help of districts’ residents. With each house serving some of the food the family would eat that day, the neighbourhood ends up with one giant table that serves various types of food.

Photos taken by Mahmoud Fekry in Cairo and Ahmed Mostafa in Assiut

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Ramadan in Malaysia https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/05/ramadan-in-malaysia/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/05/ramadan-in-malaysia/#respond Tue, 05 Jun 2018 10:00:57 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661646 Malaysia is filled with people of many races and several religions, including Muslim Malaysians, and Muslim and non-Muslim Chinese and Indians. These different races and religions all live in peace in Malaysia, and there is a spirit they share during feasts and celebrations, so Malaysia is seen as a multi-ethnic country, with a Muslim majority …

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Malaysia is filled with people of many races and several religions, including Muslim Malaysians, and Muslim and non-Muslim Chinese and Indians. These different races and religions all live in peace in Malaysia, and there is a spirit they share during feasts and celebrations, so Malaysia is seen as a multi-ethnic country, with a Muslim majority of over 60%.

Ramadan is the most important religious event for Muslims in Malaysia. The month officially starts when the minister of religious affairs makes the announcement. Afterwards, streets get crowded, especially where there are shops that sell dates, nuts, and other popular foods in Ramadan. Even Buddhist and Hindu sellers fill their bazaars with Ramadan goods.

Once the start of Ramadan is announced, municipalities spray the main streets with water and clean main squares. Also, decorations and electric lamps are hung on mosques and in the streets.

Muslims exchange greetings, and owners of shops hang signs with phrases of congratulations on them, such as “Ramadan mubarak”.

During Ramadan and before the Maghrib prayers at sunset, the areas in front of mosques become very crowded, as free Ramadan meals are given away, known as “bubur lambuk”. It is rice soup mixed with special spices, meat, and vegetables. This dish can almost only be found during Ramadan.

After Maghrib prayers, the streets of Kuala Lumpur are rather empty until Tarawih prayers, when worshippers go out wearing their distinct Malaysian hats to pray amid decorations and lights. This atmosphere lasts until the time of suhoor, when Muslims eat their last meal prior to fasting.

In Malaysia, the wealthy host iftar tables in mosques, streets, and squares. Malaysian families have a famous Ramadan meal known as “ghatri mandi”, which is made from wheat, in addition to “taval”, which is made of rice, dates, and meat.

The most important revenue creator in Malaysia is the “Ramadan bazaar”. It is a festival with foods made in Ramadan, held anywhere with nearby residential communities, especially in cities.

Nearly two hours before sunset, Muslims race to these festivals to choose their favourite foods, drinks, and sweets.

It is not unusual to also see non-Muslims racing to buy various foods at these festivals, as some of these foods can be seen only once a year, including various grilled and boiled halal meat with spices and curry. Kebab, shawerma, qatayef, and mushrooms can also all be found.

There are also traditional Malaysian meals inspired by the cuisines of India, China, and Europe.

Some of the forms of closeness among Muslims in Malaysia include offering dates, Zamzam water, coffee, and tea to all worshipers—a custom inspired from the customs of people in Mecca and Medina.

Malaysians are keen on using incense in mosques in celebration of Ramadan. Additionally, some of the rich individuals spray perfumes and pleasant scents inside these mosques.

In rural areas, iftar is done in turns. Each house is responsible for feeding the people of the village in Ramadan, showing a great degree of interdependence.

In Malaysia, similar to the case in some Arab and Islamic countries, the “mesaharaty” is still a common sight, roaming the streets to inform people it is time for suhoor.

Malaysians are keen on having their suhoor and their famous local beverage, which is known as “colac”. It is rich with the necessary elements to help fasting Muslims feels less thirst throughout the day.

Muslims hold contests during Ramadan, such as contests of modern fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) and Quran memorisation. At the end of the month, awards are given to winners in large ceremonies attended by officials from the Ministry of Religious Affairs.

Many Hindus and Buddhists become Muslims during Ramadan and announce it during the prayers of Eid Al-Fitr.

In the last 10 days of Ramadan, men remain in mosques in seclusion in large numbers. They are offered drinks and beverages as a form of solidarity that Malaysians are usually very keen on during Ramadan. Also, a few days before Eid, young people in Malaysia form committees in mosques to collect “Zakat” (alms) in order to give to the poor, so that everyone comes out of the month closer to God.

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High Five: 5 unusual party locations https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/05/high-five-5-unusual-party-locations/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/05/high-five-5-unusual-party-locations/#respond Tue, 05 Jun 2018 01:05:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661759 The post High Five: 5 unusual party locations appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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Dancing in a disco, boozing in a bar? How boring! Nowadays, partygoers aren’t satisfied with just any old party at your standard locale. They want to celebrate whenever they want, wherever they want!The very best parties are the ones that catch you by surprise. Take, for instance, your morning commute turning into a disco.

A few months ago, these so-called pre-work parties spread from London to the European continent. The idea seems to be that coffee, a croissant and a dance will make people more enthusiastic about their work.

In Sweden, similar celebrations also take place during lunch breaks. People have lunch and join the dance floor for a total of 60 minutes. It’s believed that exercise and distraction will keep them awake after they have returned to their desks.

Daily instead of exclusively

Obviously, event managers do everything they can to outdo each other, not only in terms of the timing of parties, but also the choice of locations. Some go for extraordinarily exclusive places that people cannot visit under normal circumstances. Other event managers are trying out precisely the opposite — picking normal, boring locations, like telephone booths.

A Berlin organizer turned some of these relics of the pre-mobile era into the world’s smallest party location. All you need to do in a “teledisco” is press a button, and you’ll get fog machines, strobe lights and disco balls. Where else can you take part in such an unconventional party? Check out our High Five ranking for five unusual party locales.

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Ramadan in Turkey https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/04/ramadan-in-turkey/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/04/ramadan-in-turkey/#respond Mon, 04 Jun 2018 10:30:18 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661520 Like all people in Islamic countries, Turkish Muslims receive Ramadan with joy. They rely on astronomical calculations to determine the beginning of Ramadan. It is rare to see someone watching Ramadan’s crescent, so the Turkish Directorate of Religious Affairs announces the start of Ramadan. As Ramadan starts in Turkey, lights at mosques are lit from …

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Like all people in Islamic countries, Turkish Muslims receive Ramadan with joy. They rely on astronomical calculations to determine the beginning of Ramadan. It is rare to see someone watching Ramadan’s crescent, so the Turkish Directorate of Religious Affairs announces the start of Ramadan.

As Ramadan starts in Turkey, lights at mosques are lit from Maghrib (sunset) until the next day. Banners are hung on mosques reading “welcome Ramadan” or “fast and be healthy in Ramadan” or the “shahada” (the Islamic declaration of faith) and other phrases that people can see from a distance.

Lighting mosques throughout Ramadan is known as “mahya,” which is deemed a reflection of people’s happiness with the start of the month. Some mosques have two minarets, some others have four, while some have six minarets.

It is a tradition in Ramadan in Turkey to hold a book fair that starts in the second week of the month. It opens its door to visitors throughout the month after the Maghrib prayer and continues late into the night.

The official working hours remain as they, so iftar time comes while some Turkish Muslims are still on their way home. The private sector, however, reduces work hours by nearly an hour. Charities hold what they call “Mawa’ed Al-Rahman” (God’s tables) in parks and streets, providing millions of meals not only to the poor, but for everyone who would like to attend and be present at the table during iftar time.

It is a common practice in Turkey that when it is time for the Maghrib adhan (call to prayer), cannons fire some shots. After iftar, young people, children, men, and women all rush to mosques to perform their prayers. Arriving late to the mosque may mean not finding space to pray, so the person may have to pray outside.

Religious lessons are a common practice in mosques that are filled with men and women and Tarawih prayers are met with great demand.

The Turks give special attention to “Lailat Al-Qadr”, when they read some religious chants.

Muslims are keen on “tasabih” (praises), which are usually performed during the last nights of Ramadan or on Eid Al-Fitr eve.

At Turkish tables in Ramadan, you would find dates, olives, and cheese. Before people have their iftar, some eat dates and a small portion of food, then pray Maghrib, and come back to the table for the main dish, while others eat the entire meal then pray Maghrib afterwards. The latter is more common.

Soup is the most famous dish at the Turkish table, along with some other foods which Turkish homes are famous for making. The Turkish have “pide” bread, which means “pie” and it is a word of a Persian origin. There is great demand for this kind of bread in Ramadan, with people queuing at bakeries hours before iftar for it.

Pies (round bread of different sizes) are the most commonly eaten food at iftar, as children wait to get their share from bakeries before iftar time.

Some of the most prominent sweets in Turkey in Ramadan are kanafeh, qatayef, and baklava.

For suhoor, Turkish Muslims usually eat olives, cheese, honey, and bread. They also have tea. People usually hang lighting and decorations around their houses to add a touch of beauty.

The tradition of “mesaharaty” is still famous in Turkey to this very day, as it is his job to awake the sleeping to have their suhoor.

A mesaharaty is the guest of all Turkish alleys, towns, and cities in Ramadan as he wanders the streets with his drum.

As the second half of Ramadan approaches, visitors are allowed into a mosque called Hırka-i Şerif in Istanbul. It is said that inside of it, there is the blessed mantle of prophet Muhammad, which was brought by Sultan Selim to Istanbul after his trip to the Islamic East in 1516. During the regular days of the year, visitors are not allowed inside.

During the first half of Ramadan, Turks are used to saying “welcome Ramadan,” and “farewell” during its second half.

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Egypt becomes first Arab country to chair UNESCO subcommittee of 1970 cultural property treaty https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/03/egypt-becomes-first-arab-country-to-chair-unesco-subcommittee-of-1970-cultural-property-treaty/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/03/egypt-becomes-first-arab-country-to-chair-unesco-subcommittee-of-1970-cultural-property-treaty/#respond Sun, 03 Jun 2018 13:00:24 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661392 Egypt was unanimously selected on Friday to be the head of UNESCO’s subcommittee, the 1970 Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export, and Transport of Ownership of Cultural Property, which is an international treaty, according to state-owned EgyNews. The selection makes Egypt the first Middle Eastern country to head the committee …

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Egypt was unanimously selected on Friday to be the head of UNESCO’s subcommittee, the 1970 Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export, and Transport of Ownership of Cultural Property, which is an international treaty, according to state-owned EgyNews.

The selection makes Egypt the first Middle Eastern country to head the committee and it will do so for a year.

Egypt’s Ambassador to France and Permanent Representative to UNESCO Ihab Badawi said that this reflects the appreciation other participating countries feel towards the role Egypt plays in promoting international efforts to prevent illegal trade of cultural properties.

He also added that the Egyptian delegation to UNESCO will focus on intensifying the work of the committee to achieve a breakthrough in its field internationally, especially with the important attention Egypt pays to retrieving all of its illegally smuggled artefacts.

Before the selection, Egypt participated in the 21st Session of the Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in case of Illicit Appropriation last week, where it offered its vision for enhancing the committee’s procedures in preventing artefact smuggling and discussed options to prevent online trade of illegal antiquities.

The treaty, signed in 14 November 1970, includes 136 countries. The treaty has several committees, and the subcommittee Egypt is currently chairing is the treaty’s latest, formed in 2013.

The treaty focuses on the required procedures and rules in order to prevent a country from forcibly losing its cultural property whether through occupation or theft.

Cultural property is defined, according to the treaty, as the possessions countries decide hold importance for history, art, literature, antiquities, and education. That includes discovered antiquities, parts of ancient art sculptures or paintings, coins, ancient handmade products, and rare inscriptions. 

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New compound advertisement accused of insulting women, owner apologises https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/03/new-compound-advertisement-accused-of-insulting-women-owner-apologises/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/03/new-compound-advertisement-accused-of-insulting-women-owner-apologises/#respond Sun, 03 Jun 2018 12:00:41 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661396 Ad stars Hany Salama, shows compound as place for men to escape their annoying, nagging wives

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While accepting a part in an advertisement campaign for a new residential compound, famous Egyptian actor Hany Salama did not know it would open a barrage of criticism against him with floods of accusations that he insulted women and female fans stating that they lost their respect for him.

Appearing with an on-screen wife whom he constantly wants to get rid of and is portrayed as annoying and constant nagging caused a wave of rage among Salama’s female fans, who saw that the portrayed image of women in the ad is offensive and unacceptable.

Like many Egyptian artists, Salama took part in Memaar Al Morshedy’s recent ads, in which the company, one of the biggest real estate companies in Egypt, promotes its latest compound, Skyline. In the advertisement, Salama appears speaking to the audience saying that the compound’s services are very close to all residents, allowing them to do multiple things together, unlike anywhere else.

Married to a wife who appears to be annoying, the ad explores ways Salama tries to escape his on-screen wife’s stressful comments and pressure. In one of the scenes, he is featured having dinner with her, before he looks at the audience and says, “and if you are fed up, you can escape for a couple of hours and rest,” as the scene switches to him by a swimming pool.

In another scene of the ad, which is under a minute, Salama is displayed dancing with his wife.

“My head is spinning,” she says. “Yes, that is the exact required thing,” he answers.

Social media platforms showered Salama and the company with accusations of wrongly portraying females in the ads.

Women of Egypt, an advocacy movement with the aim of empowering Egyptian women, said that the advertisement makes fun of women in a supposedly comical way. “The advertisement contains clear male insulting messages. Instead of marketing the place as a residence for couples to spend time having fun together, it markets it as a place where men can escape their wives,” the statement read.

“Mocking women is the advertisement’s main theme. These male messages are being absorbed by children and create a whole generation that does not respect women,” it added.

Female social media users also expressed their rejection of the advertisement, saying that Salama already lost many of his women fan base, who make up the majority of the actor’s admirers, who is known to attract women for his handsomeness.

“It’s 2018, and as you may have heard, objectifying women and portraying them as dumb, whiney, and just downright clueless doesn’t go unnoticed anymore. It might come as a surprise to know that women actually have brains, and guess what, too: they use them,” Nour Nasrldin said in a Facebook post, adding, “I believe that this is precisely the ad’s message: now you have a place to run to whenever your wife’s getting on your nerves or your asshole children are just becoming too much. This is not only offensive but also sickening. According to the way you see females, and the way the ad creators obviously do as well; you all have some deeply rooted unresolved childhood issues that inhibit you from fully utilising your own brains.”

Meanwhile, many men defended the advertisement, stating that it only features reality, and showcases the life of most of men after marriage.

“I see nothing in this advertisement but the condition of most of my married friends. While some find it insulting, I believe it only mirrors real life,” a male user commented on Facebook.

For his part, the owner of Memaar Al Morshedy, Hassan Al Morshedy, published an official apology to the women of Egypt who saw the advertisement as offensive, explaining that they only intended to feature the reality of young married couples in a “light, funny way.”

“I have nothing but total respect for women. They helped me be the man I am today, and I will always be grateful to them,” he stated.

“Thank you for spotlighting this. We will be extremely careful the next time, and to all the women who felt insulted, we have nothing but love and respect for you,” he concluded.

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Ramadan in Russia https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/03/ramadan-in-russia/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/06/03/ramadan-in-russia/#respond Sun, 03 Jun 2018 11:00:36 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661364 Ramadan has special elements that distinguish it from the rest of the months in Russia, like many enjoyable traditions that begin once the start of the holy month is announced. Some of these traditions include lighting roads and streets with special lights. Fasting hours in Russia sometimes reach 22 hours, which makes them among the …

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Ramadan has special elements that distinguish it from the rest of the months in Russia, like many enjoyable traditions that begin once the start of the holy month is announced. Some of these traditions include lighting roads and streets with special lights. Fasting hours in Russia sometimes reach 22 hours, which makes them among the longest fasting hours in the world.

Muslims in Russia go about their everyday lives without any changes in work hours or holidays, unlike the case in many Muslim countries.

There are four mosques in Moscow, and Tarawih prayers are performed in them throughout the whole month.

In Moscow, Ramadan tents beside all mosques is considered one of the most important highlights of Ramadan. They contain group fasting tables and accommodate up to 600 persons. Famous meals in Russian regions with Muslims are offered, and Quran competitions are usually held for children.

In Ramadan, Muslims in Russia are keen on inviting those who can read Quran well to read the holy book out loud then deliver a lesson or sermon, which is usually met with great attention.

Since Russia is a big country, each city in it has its own customs and traditions that distinguishes it from others.

During the month, relationships between Muslims blossom and people invite each other over for meals almost daily, especially families.

In recent years, the number of restaurants and shops that offer halal meat has increased, not only during Ramadan, but throughout the year. It is also common to see non-Muslims buying halal meat because they would be inviting their friends over for iftar at their homes, which is a beautiful gesture that positively affects their lives and relationships.

Similar to Muslims in Islamic countries, Russian Muslims wake up before the Fajr (dawn) prayer to have their suhoor, then the family of a single household performs the Fajr prayer together, after which they all go to work or school as usual. The only difference in Russia is the long fasting hours compared to the case in Muslim countries.

Kvass is a favourite traditional drink for Russians during Ramadan. It is made of “black bread” and is given the flavour of fruits, raisins, or herbs. Russians rely on this drink to deal with thirst.

In some areas in Russia, selling alcoholic beverages is banned during Ramadan.

One of the favourite meals of Muslims in Russia is a dish made of ground meat, rice, and spices, which is shaped into balls, and then boiled, with special sauce added on top.

Iftar tables in Ramadan mostly consist of vegetables and fruits, including the kompot, which is a drink made of fresh and dried fruits, and since fasting hours are very long in Russia, only delicious kompot can make a fasting person less thirsty at iftar. Afterwards, people have many kinds of different salads, then the main dish, which typically contains meat or fish.

There are also stuffed vegetables, such as zucchini, tomatoes, and eggplants, and there is duck and goose stuffed with sour apples and nuts, along with cakes which are considered a heavy dish themselves.

When it comes to sweets, Muslims in Russia only eat fruits, and during visits to one another’s homes, they make some sweets such as honey cake, known as medovik.

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Ramadan in Chad https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/31/ramadan-in-chad/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/31/ramadan-in-chad/#respond Thu, 31 May 2018 10:00:08 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661272 Even though it is not an Arab country, Chad has many Arab characteristics. Ramadan in Chad is an Arab and African combination. Besides French, Arabic is the official language and the one used in daily life in Chad, especially among Muslims, who form a majority of the country. The name of the country is taken …

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Even though it is not an Arab country, Chad has many Arab characteristics. Ramadan in Chad is an Arab and African combination.

Besides French, Arabic is the official language and the one used in daily life in Chad, especially among Muslims, who form a majority of the country.

The name of the country is taken from a kind of fish in a lake named Chad, hence the name of the lake and the country became Chad. Some say that the word Chad is derived from a word that means shore. As for the Chadian capital, N’Djamena, it roughly means “place of rest”.

Chadian Muslims prepare for Ramadan a month before its arrival. They fast during the months of Rajab and Shaaban which precede the holy month.

Some of the interesting things that happen before Ramadan is that children and young people build many mosques from clay and other components that make the buildings stronger, with a height of nearly a metre and a half. They pray in these buildings and read lots of the Qur’an, all of which helps spread the spirit of communication and interdependence among them.

The habit of the mesaharaty (person who awakens people for suhoor) is still very common there, however, a group of young people with drums walk around the street to wake people up and let them know it is suhoor time. At the end of the month, they get rewarded with grains, fruits, and money. The mesaharaties start their work on the first night of Ramadan.

A different habit in Chad is multiple marriages before Ramadan rather than after it. They believe that marriages are blessed and make men happy if they have wives to spend Ramadan with and to cook Ramadan dishes throughout the month.

Women in Chad are keen on storing all their Ramadan food weeks before the month begins. They buy wheat and meat (that is home dried after being sliced), in addition to dates, ginger, peanuts, cowpeas, hibiscus, and apricot juice.

The reason women buy all these things is that they want to prepare charity banquets and help the poor and needy.

In Chad, the rich race to do good deeds and prepare meals on the streets, in squares, and in mosques. Chadian women choose certain kinds of foods carefully for suhoor, in order to help the fasting persevere without food or drinks for the entire day, which is usually very hot.

In Ramadan, relatives gather around tables during iftar time (women alone and men alone). Shortly before iftar time, the doors of homes are opened before those who do not make it home in time to break their fast, so they eat with the families that allow them to, breaking many social barriers between Chadian people.

In Chad, fasting people start their iftar with dates and a famous local drink named “abry.” It is made of corn and spices, especially ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, and carnation. One of the famous drinks is “anqara”, which is made of hibiscus and millet. The dish “madeeda” is one of the most famous dishes in Ramadan in Chad, especially in rural areas. The dish “aseeda” is also one of the main dishes in Ramadan there. Sliced home-dried meat is also a favourite meal.

After iftar, Chadians eat sweets and sugary drinks with dark tea. Noteworthy, the Chadian cuisine is highly impacted by the famous meals in neighbouring countries, such as Sudan and Egypt.

Rural areas are more active in Chad during Ramadan, as people there perform the Tarawih and Tahajod prayers, and go into seclusion in mosques. They also gather for Qeyam Al-Lail and attend many religious sessions, especially Fiqh and Quranic exegesis. They also give great attention to the last 10 days of Ramadan by performing Tahajod prayers and reading more of the Quran.

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Madiha Yousry dies at 97 https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/madiha-yousry-dies-at-97/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/madiha-yousry-dies-at-97/#respond Wed, 30 May 2018 16:45:01 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661207 Distinguished Egyptian actress Madiha Yousry died on Tuesday at the age of 97 after a long battle with illness. The funeral of the prominent actress was held in Al-Sayeda Nafisa Mosque on Wednesday. Dubbed the Nile Brunette, Yousry was named one of the 10 most beautiful women in the 1940s. Yousry was born in 1921. …

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Distinguished Egyptian actress Madiha Yousry died on Tuesday at the age of 97 after a long battle with illness.

The funeral of the prominent actress was held in Al-Sayeda Nafisa Mosque on Wednesday. Dubbed the Nile Brunette, Yousry was named one of the 10 most beautiful women in the 1940s.

Yousry was born in 1921. She was first introduced to the silver screen at the hands of director Mohammed Karim, in his film “Mamno’ El-Hob” (Love is Forbidden), where she performed alongside Egyptian icon Mohammed Abdel Wahab.

Throughout her career, Yousry participated in around 90 films, in which her roles varied between romance, comedy, and tragedy.

Earlier this year, she was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Academy of Arts for the legacy she enriched the Arab world with.

Egypt’s Minister of Culture Inas Abdel Dayem mourned Yousry’s loss, saying that she left behind a huge legacy for upcoming generations to learn from.

The National Council for Women also mourned Yousry’s death, stating that Egypt lost a remarkable, unique icon, yet her name will always be remembered in the hearts of Egyptians and Arabs through the work she has left them.

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Works of art made with plastic trash https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/works-of-art-made-with-plastic-trash/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/works-of-art-made-with-plastic-trash/#respond Wed, 30 May 2018 14:07:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661170 The post Works of art made with plastic trash appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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Plastic, plastic everywhere: Littering our beaches, swirling into a giant island in the middle of the Pacific, landing in the bellies of birds and marine beasts. Artists are trying to prevent that with unique works.Many people seem to be in agreement that there is too much plastic in use and nowhere for it to go once it’s no longer needed. Those plastic toys, soda bottles and used toothbrushes need to land somewhere once they’re tossed out — and often, that means they end up on beaches and in the ocean.

With the protection of the environment high on their agenda, members of the European Commission have been looking at ways to reduce the amount of plastic in circulation. After proposing that individual member states find ways to reduce the use of plastic bags, in 2014, the European Parliament passed a directive calling for a reduction in these bags use by 50 percent by 2017 and 80 percent by 2019.

Now the EU Commission is planning a ban on plastic wasteand is looking into strategies to reduce single-use plastic — items including coffee cups and lids, plasticware and to-go food containers. Brussels’ priority, Frans Timmermans told The Guardian and other newspapers, was to chip away at the amount of throwaway plastics, “that take five seconds to produce, you use it for five minutes and it takes 500 years to break down again.”

Read more:Germany’s waste problem: Recycling isn’t enough

Creative reuse

But what to do about all those plastics already floating around?

Artists and designers around the globe have been looking at creative ways to reuse the plastic that’s already landed on beaches. Spanish artist Joan Miro collected the rubbish that washed ashore on the beaches of Mallorca on his morning walks and turned them into colorful monster-like sculptures. Ghana-born artist Ed Franklin Gauva turns trash into Yiiiiikakaii masks. And the sportswear company Adidas created a line of sneakers that employed recycled fishing nets into the Adidas x Parley line, aimed at drawing awareness to ocean pollution.

Have a look in the picture gallery above to see the innovative ways other artists are reusing plastic in their work.

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Reliving historic Ramadan spirit in Old Cairo https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/reliving-historic-ramadan-spirit-in-old-cairo/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/reliving-historic-ramadan-spirit-in-old-cairo/#respond Wed, 30 May 2018 12:00:29 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661133   Amid the special spirit Ramadan brings in Egypt, one cannot miss spending a day of the holy month at one of Cairo’s most sacred districts, Al-Hussein area. In the heart of Old Cairo, the district combines between the cherished Islamic places of worship and one-of-a-kind entertaining atmosphere. Stepping inside the area before the Maghrib …

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Amid the special spirit Ramadan brings in Egypt, one cannot miss spending a day of the holy month at one of Cairo’s most sacred districts, Al-Hussein area.

In the heart of Old Cairo, the district combines between the cherished Islamic places of worship and one-of-a-kind entertaining atmosphere.

Stepping inside the area before the Maghrib (sunset) call to prayer, is like traveling in time and place to the Fatimid era, as voices of different Quran reciters take over the alleys and streets. Only a few minutes separate this holiness of Quran, after the iftar call is announced, and the place turning into a social hub of tanoura dancers, Ramadan songs, and people socialising in every corner.

Ramadan nights in the Al-Hussein and Al-Muezz areas last until the early hours of dawn. People tend to spend their nights at El-Fishawy Café and nearby local coffee shops, where local singers perform some of the most well-known heritage songs, and juice vendors roam the area selling Ramadan’s famous juices, hibiscus tea, and liquorice juice.

     

Old Cairo is a revival of Ramadan’s lifestyle in the past and spending a night there is an attempt people make to escape Cairo’s modernism and spend a few hours recalling Egypt’s lost legacy.

All photos taken by Mahmoud Fekry

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Ramadan in Azerbaijan https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/ramadan-in-azerbaijan/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/30/ramadan-in-azerbaijan/#respond Wed, 30 May 2018 11:00:07 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661103 Azerbaijan is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. It is called the country of lakes, having the largest number of inland lakes in the world. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Azerbaijan restored its lost Islamic identity. Despite the fact that Azerbaijan had been under communist rule for 70 years, the …

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Azerbaijan is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. It is called the country of lakes, having the largest number of inland lakes in the world. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Azerbaijan restored its lost Islamic identity. Despite the fact that Azerbaijan had been under communist rule for 70 years, the religious identity and tolerance of the Azerbaijanis never changed.
The former communist regime of Azerbaijan left behind a secular government, though it did not neglect the Muslim identity of the people and the country, and allowed free practice of their rituals. The Azerbaijanis freely perform prayers in mosques and squares, and celebrate Ramadan and other Islamic holidays, such as Eid Al-Fitr.
The Azeri Muslims start celebrating Ramadan in the middle of Shaban, the Islamic month that precedes Ramadan. They organise horse races, one of their most common customs to show their happiness. They also hold folkloric celebrations and start decorating streets, while families exchange congratulations.
During Ramadan, the Azerbaijanis are keen to exchange gifts with neighbours and offer food to the poor and needy. The Azeri families are known for their generosity as they always prepare an extra dish for iftar (meal to break the fast) in case they receive unexpected guests. One of the special traditions of the Azeri people during Ramadan is fulfilling vows. If anyone made a vow when he was in a crisis, they fulfil it during the holy month of Ramadan, whether through increasing prayers, fasting extra days after Ramadan, or holding charity banquets.
During Ramadan, the state-run TV channels present religious programmes to raise awareness of prayer, fasting, and Zakat (obligatory alms).
The Azeri people also hold religious ceremonies for Quran recitation by the most famous reciters in the Islamic world.
The Azeri families gather before iftar and one of the elderly, who usually know Arabic, read some verses of the Quran to young people who do not understand Arabic and explain the meanings of the verses in the Azeri language. Then, they start the iftar meal with eating dates and milk. Different types of soup are served at almost all Azeri banquets.
Food is an important aspect of the Azerbaijani culture. The Azeri cuisine is very diverse, as there are nine different climatic zones in the country. This contributes to the increase of land fertility and diversity of crops.
One of the most popular Ramadan foods is dolma. It consists of minced lamb mixed with rice and flavoured with mint, fennel, and cinnamon, and wrapped in vine leaves or cabbage leaves. Another popular dish is plov, which is frequently served at large gatherings in the country. It consists of rice served with lamb (sometimes beef), onions, and carrots. It is usually eaten at the end of iftar. Plov has more than 40 different recipes. Plov dishes have different names depending on the main ingredients accompanying the rice.
There is also qovurma. It is a cooked dish of several varieties, all of which involve stewing meat with fruit, herbs, or vegetables. Other second courses include a wide variety of kebabs and shashlik, including lamb, beef, chicken, duck, and fish (baliq) kebabs. The variety of Azerbaijani dishes comes from mixing the Russian and Turkish cuisines, which are based largely on ancient traditions and oriental cooking.
Each region of Azerbaijan is characterised by its own dishes, which mainly use local products and vegetables, and this feature is reflected in Ramadan as well.

After the iftar, the Muslims in the capital Baku folk to the Turkish mosque established in the early 1990s to perform Tarawih prayer. Hundreds of citizens perform their prayers with the Muslim foreign communities there who usually hold large Ramadan banquets for charity. The Islamic centers of foreign embassies distribute religious books and allocate places for worshipers to perform all the daily prayers. They also host sermons usually delivered by preachers from Al-Azhar.

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Kippa worn during anti-Semitic attack heads to Berlin museum https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/29/kippa-worn-during-anti-semitic-attack-heads-to-berlin-museum/ https://dailynewsegypt.com/2018/05/29/kippa-worn-during-anti-semitic-attack-heads-to-berlin-museum/#respond Tue, 29 May 2018 13:22:00 +0000 https://www.dailynewsegypt.com/?p=661003 The post Kippa worn during anti-Semitic attack heads to Berlin museum appeared first on Daily News Egypt.

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The skullcap worn by an Israeli youth when he was attacked on the streets of Berlin will become an exhibit at Berlin’s Jewish Museum. They hope to continue a dialogue about anti-Semitism prompted by the assault.An attack on a man wearing a kippa on the streets of Berlin's Prenzlauer Berg district drew headlines in April, after video footage of the assault released by one of the victims went viral on social media.

Now that skullcap will go on display at the Jewish Museum of Berlin in an effort by museum officials to respond in a more timely way to those events influencing contemporary life.

"Museums are discursive places. We have to respond more quickly to current events and react to movements in a society. With the rapid response method, we want to invite our visitors to enter into a dialogue," said program director, Léontine Meijer-van Mensch.

Read more: The kippa, a sign of respect for God

Labeled "Die Kippa des Anstosses," which roughly translates to "The Triggering Kippa," the skullcap will be on show as of Thursday and is to be included in the museum's new permanent display, set to open in 2019. The collection, museum director Peter Schaefer told dpa, will place a greater emphasis on the Jewish faith than it has in the past.

Triggering dialogue and solidarity

The kippa was worn by an Arab Israeli visiting Berlin in April; he had worn the skullcap although he is not Jewish in an attempt to prove it was not dangerous to wear one in Berlin. He began filming with his mobile phone, however, when a 19-year-old refugee from Syria began shouting "Yahudi" — the Arab word for Jew — at him and a friend and lashing them with a belt.

Read more: Video of alleged anti-Semitic attack in Berlin sparks outrage

The provocation came at a time when anti-Semitism was on the minds of many in Germany.

After two rappers who used anti-Semitic lyrics in their rhymes were awarded an Echo, the highest music prize handed out to those who sold the highest number of records, other musicians returned their prizes in protest. At the same time, Germany appointed its first anti-Semitism commissioner, Felix Klein.

In response to the confrontation, a demonstration of solidarity was coordinated and thousands of Berliners met on April 25, 2018 for the action "Berlin wears Kippa."

Read more: 2,000 Berliners wear skullcaps to protest anti-Semitism

ct/eg (dpa, epd)

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